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Where the Crawdads Sing ( Audio Title)

(10 customer reviews)

$22.50

by Delia Owens (Author), Cassandra Campbell (Narrator), Penguin Audio (Publisher)

Synopsis

Number One New York Times Best-Selling Phenomenon

More than six million copies sold worldwide

A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick

Business Insider Defining Book of the Decade

“I can’t even express how much I love this book! I didn’t want this story to end!” (Reese Witherspoon)

“Painfully beautiful.” (The New York Times Book Review)

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life – until the unthinkable happens.

Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.

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About this book

Audio Format
12 Hours
Unabridged Version

Description

Number One New York Times Best-Selling Phenomenon

More than six million copies sold worldwide

A Reese Witherspoon x Hello Sunshine Book Club Pick

Business Insider Defining Book of the Decade

“I can’t even express how much I love this book! I didn’t want this story to end!” (Reese Witherspoon)

“Painfully beautiful.” (The New York Times Book Review)

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life – until the unthinkable happens.

Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.

10 reviews for Where the Crawdads Sing ( Audio Title)

  1. docholden

    I was very disappointed in this book after reading all the hype about it. While the reading is good, the story is so nonsensical- a 6 year old left alone in a shack raises herself, living in the same shack, using the same boat, and no one lifts a hand to help her? In more than 20 years, the boat never breaks down, the house doesn’t need repairs and she’s able to wear the same clothes for many years….she’s got long hair that she says is ratty and tangled but description s of it has it down her back, luxurious…she’s gorgeous but bathing is optional until in her 20s…she has sex with a philanderer but never gets a vd and not once apparently does she get sick. No flu, cold, nothing….she never got shots and apparently has the immune system of a super hero because she stepped on a nail and never got tetanus….I kept reading so I’d finish and the ending is unexpected but it’s generally a boring book where day after day, she’s alone in the marsh….

  2. Lou

    I was sure I would like this book..and actually finished it. I grew more irritated with each page by the last half. I grew up in coastal North Carolina and was born in the 40s, so would be the same age as the main characters. It was clear that the author did not do her research about the area and about what would be plausible at the time of the story. When she mentioned real towns, she should have known Asheville would not be the destination city from the coast, especially in the 60s. Ma’s old cardboard suitcase that had been in the closet in the marsh for 19 years would be covered in mildew, Fireflies would have been called lightening bugs. No boy in a small town in NC would have been named either Tate or Chase in 40s, more recent popular names. I could go on and on. The inconsistencies in the dialect was grating, and many parts of the story were just not believable to me. I am amazed that so many people loved the book and the poetry.

  3. Don Meyers

    About half this book was good. Beautifully written at times, and with an interesting, plausible story. But wait…the gaps …Maybe less time talking about Kya fumbling around with sex with Chase and more time on her development as a renowned author and painter would have been nice. There’s more, but you may be reading the book. I must comment though on the most ridiculous court room antics since Curly’s trial in a Three Stooges short. Oh, I think I just did. (And just after reading a book on Harper Lee – if you know what I mean). This was one of the most disappointing books I have read in quite a long time. Sorry Ms. Witherspoon. Can I get my money back if I return the book?

  4. Emily O

    This book had so many fantastic reviews. I was looking forward to reading it but quickly became disillusioned. I’m from NC and have never heard anyone talk with the type of accents Ms. Owens chose for her characters. It seems like a small thing but it was extremely distracting, and eventually became ridiculous, especially because the characters somehow switched back and forth between speaking like Mark Twain’s Jim to perfect English. It made me wonder if the author has ever been to our fair state. The story was good enough, albeit predictable, and it’s obvious the author did her research on marsh life. I learned quite a few wildlife facts that were interesting. The conversations just kept me wrinkling up my nose with distaste and I ended the book on a sour note.

  5. Diane Parker

    I read a lot. Sometimes folks refer a title to me … sometimes I don’t ALWAYS ‘adjust’ to the referring individuals taste. My niece recommended this title and said, “It’s not so much the story line … even though that’s VERY good … but, the WRITING style. After the first pages, I was HOOKED. Love Ms. Owen’s style. Descriptive, picturesque speech.

  6. rickeitt

    This is one of the most moving, caring, emotional novels I have ever read. I read this book only because I had met Delia and have read her wildlife books she wrote with husband Mark Owens. After starting the book this was all I could think about for days. Kya’s life become part of mine and the characters ceased to live on the page… they were alive with me and I was in the marsh, feeling every feather – the air, creatures and the plants. Jumpin’ became a trusted friend and so many moments touched my very soul. I should not have been surprised as Delia has a great style in her wildlife books that I love to read. But a novel like this is not my normal read. Maybe I need to now reconsider what I choose as this book stopped me cold and made me rethink a lot that happened in my life. Delia touched the human soul with her behavioral descriptions. She is not only a respected wildlife scientist, she is a human behaviorist and understands more about the human condition that just about anyone else I know. This is a tremendous treasure of a book and I’m sure it’s staying in my read again list for a long time. Highly recommend the book.

  7. Debbie

    I am extremely stingy with my compliments for good books, but this tale is well-deserving of the praise. Of the last dozen or so books I’ve read, only two others earned five complete stars by me: She Read to Us in the Late Afternoons: A Life in Novels by Kathleen Hill, and Circe by Madeline Miller.I have to confess that I have also had magical moments with marsh creatures such as herons, eagles, and mud turtles. Like the main character, Kya, I am a compulsive collector of treasures from those Great Rock Tumblers: the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean which makes this book so attractive to me. However, Delia Owens’ writing is more than just about the natural world. She spins a good and very well-written tale about murder, courtroom drama, nature, poetry, and even love.Another reviewer described Owens’ writing as lyrical. It is. Take your time and savor every sentence.

  8. P Wilson

    Wow! I just finished reading Where the Crawdads Sing. And I will say it again, Wow! This books is so filled with emotion. Kya, the main character, is trying to survive by herself from a young age. She has been abandoned by those who should teach her, guide her, protect her. She has to fend for herself. Two men come into her life and teach her about the good and bad in life. I only keep few book’s that I know I will read again. This is staying in my library.

  9. Joy of Reading

    Can’t read, no school, starved and all alone but learns to read and then studies Einstein, really? Left all alone her whole life but the towns 2 most eligible bachelors fall for her, a good guy and a bad boy, really? I’m definitely in the minority.

  10. Cariola

    Wow, how can so many readers rave about this book? I thought it was just awful. It took me every minute of the two weeks I had it on loan to get to the end. I don’t know why I stuck with it as it was painful every time I picked it up; maybe I was in the mood for masochism. So what’s wrong with it? Well, for one thing, every page was screaming at me, “This is sad. So sad. SO SAD!!!” I have a strong bias against books that I feel are emotionally manipulating me. As soon as I started reading about The Marsh Girl, I was reminded of ‘Beasts of the Southern Wild,’ a wonderful story of a little girl living alone with her sick father in the swamps. Mother gone, dad drinks too much and frequently disappears, both try to avoid the bad, bad authorities, and both love the natural environment even though it causes hardships–but that’s where the similarity ends. ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ should hope to be a tenth as good (but it isn’t). It also can’t decide whether it is a coming of age story or a murder mystery; the chapters jump between telling the story of Kya’s life and the investigation of a murder for which she is later tried. And those trial scenes were the absolute most hackneyed that I have ever read. Old Perry Mason scripts were better. Secondary character–with the exception of Jumpin’, a black man who runs a tiny gas station/convenience store that serves boaters, and his wife Mabel, are total stereotypes. 1) Jordie, the helpful older brother who quickly disappears, leaving Kya alone with 2) the drunken, abusive dad who isn’t all bad when he’s sober. 3) The Good Boy, Tate, who becomes Kya’s only friend, and 4) The Bad Boy, Chase, the seduce-and-abandon type. 5) The cocky police chief and 6) his cocky assistant and 7) the cocky prosecutor. As to the writing: I love nature as much as the next person, but the writing in the long, long, tedious, repetitive passages describing shells and sea gulls and bird feathers and fireflies were, in my opinion, just plain bad (but not as bad as the trial chapters). And a really bad “surprise” ending.I could go on, but just–ugh.

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