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Ninth House ( Audio Title )

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$44.99

by Leigh Bardugo

Synopsis

A LOCUS AWARD FINLIST!

“Bardugo’s latest is a must-listen, introducing a haunting, Yale-based occult world populated with gloriously complicated characters… A win-win-win, honestly.” — Paste, best audiobooks of 2019

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Leigh Bardugo comes a mesmerizing tale of power, privilege, and dark magic set among the Ivy League elite.

This program includes a bonus conversation with the author.

Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug-dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. In fact, by age twenty, she is the sole survivor of horrific, unsolved multiple homicides. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most prestigious universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her?

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About this book

Audio Format
16.4 Hours
Unabridged Version

Description

This program includes a bonus conversation with the author.

Galaxy “Alex” Stern is the most unlikely member of Yale’s freshman class. Raised in the Los Angeles hinterlands by a hippie mom, Alex dropped out of school early and into a world of shady drug-dealer boyfriends, dead-end jobs, and much, much worse. In fact, by age twenty, she is the sole survivor of horrific, unsolved multiple homicides. Some might say she’s thrown her life away. But at her hospital bed, Alex is offered a second chance: to attend one of the world’s most prestigious universities on a full ride. What’s the catch, and why her?

Still searching for answers, Alex arrives in New Haven tasked by her mysterious benefactors with monitoring the activities of Yale’s secret societies. Their eight windowless “tombs” are the well-known haunts of the rich and powerful, from high-ranking politicos to Wall Street’s biggest players. But their occult activities are more sinister and more extraordinary than any paranoid imagination might conceive. They tamper with forbidden magic. They raise the dead. And, sometimes, they prey on the living.

Ninth House is the long-awaited adult debut by the beloved author of Shadow and Bone and Six of Crows. Leigh Bardugo will take her place alongside Lev Grossman and Deborah Harkness as one of the finest practitioners of literary fantasy writing today.

A Macmillan Audio production from Flatiron Books

Ninth House is the best fantasy novel I’ve read in years because it’s about real people. Bardugo’s imaginative reach is brilliant, and this story—full of shocks and twists—is impossible to put down.” – Stephen King

Ninth House is one of the best fantasy novels I’ve read in years. This book is brilliant, funny, raw, and utterly magnificent — it’s a portal to a world you’ll never want to leave.” – Lev Grossman, New York Timesbestselling author of The Magicians

“In this mesmerizing novel, Leigh Bardugo introduces us to Alex, a high-school dropout who gets a free ride to Yale because of a unique talent. Bardugo’s New Haven is plausible and frightening, and I was one rapt reader.” – Charlaine Harris, bestselling author of the True Blood series

Additional information

FORMAT

Audio CD, audiobook CD, Hardcover, more, Paperback

Reviews

  1. Virginia E. Demarce

    We’re often told not to review a book unless we finished reading it. However, I think it’s fair to tell readers that a book was such a combination of boring and confusing that a purchaser at full (and not cheap) price abandoned it about a quarter of the way through as more trouble than it was worth.

  2. M. Maxwell

    I didn’t regret buying the Six of Crows duology in hardcover, but I sure regret buying Ninth House in hardcover. There’s a reason most of the praise blurbs on the cover are from horror writers. And I read an interview with the author where she said it’s considered adult because of the structure, but I disagree—it’s because of the sex and graphic violence, I’d bet. It reads a lot like early Anita Blake, minus vampires. I don’t know whether it’s an effort to break out of the epic fantasy box to go gritty magical realism, but this is really just another magic at college book. And as far as structure goes, it’s told in flashbacks–takes you right out of the story. It’s more about survival and privilege or the lack thereof than growing up, though there is growth. It’s totally young adult. But it’s urban fantasy leaning towards horror, and I see no reason to pay hardcover prices for this book, especially if it manages to become a series.

  3. Kindle Customer

    Lev Grossman said of this book, “it’s a portal to a world you’ll never want to leave.” I hope he was talking about a different book, because the book I just read had ghost rape, wildly corrupt authorities, horrifying reveals that would impress Christopher Nolan, and more blood and gore than Carrie at the prom. If that’s all cool with you, however, this book is almost a relief to read, because it avoids the more irritating tropes of the horror genre (sl*t-shaming, inter-racial violence, fridging, etc.) in favor of a smart, funny, alarmingly relatable series of characters who handle their sh** in a world constantly ready to give them more. (Okay, there’s a tiny bit of fridging. It’s complicated.)I read that Leigh Bardugo was a member of the Wolf’s Head society when she attended Yale in real life. In this book, Wolf’s Head practices shape-shifting magic where the object is to take on the body of an animal but retain human consciousness and intelligence. Maybe that’s why this story sometimes seems to be a metaphor for/magical primer on surviving the brutality of the world by taking on the “shape” of a much stronger creature, while still keeping hold of your humanity. It’s a great message regardless of who it’s coming from, but as Professor Belbalm notes, “Calamity comes too easily to women. Our lives can come apart in a single gesture, a rogue wave.” Bardugo writes Alex with such vivid vulnerability and desperation that her snarky bitchiness and moments of sweetness are impressive accomplishments rather than weakness of character. I don’t typically like horror stories, but I think I might love this book.Okay Ms. Bardugo, I know you’re busy, but when do you think we can get our favorite gentleman out of his jam?

  4. Nichole Bellow

    So. . .this was disappointing to read and this is hard to write. I have enjoyed Bardugo’s novels in her Grishaverse.(Those books are high 4 star ratings for me) I was so excited to see this story: mystery going on at Yale. Bit of magic. Morally gray characters. So excited. When I got the book on Tuesday, I started reading right away and -I was confused and bored for a good bit of the first six chapters. I went on reading, thinking things would get better, but they never really did. I didn’t feel anything for the characters. I didn’t feel like the story was going anywhere interesting. It was so disappointing, because this was one of my most anticipated books of the year. Maybe my expectations were too high? Maybe I’m just not in the right mood for this kind of story? I don’t know. What I do know is that it took me four days to read this and I never wanted to pick it up. I had to force myself.I don’t think it helps matters that the start of the book – with the info dumps and the flashbacks – felt (for me!) shaky and all over the place. I’m never confused when reading, but I found myself often pausing to go back and recheck somethings. The novel as a whole felt overly long and like a lot of setup for things to come. It didn’t need to be nearly 500 pages – 300 pages would have worked just fine. I didn’t care about these characters – the felt flat or like copies of people from other Bardugo works. At times, it also felt like it was being “dark” and “gritty” just to be “dark” and “gritty” or because Bardugo wanted this to be an adult novel.I understand that I’m in the minority here and that people are loving this novel, and I’m so happy that people are enjoying it as much as they are. I’m just disappointed that I didn’t enjoy this novel. I may come back to it someday, I may not. I do know that I will go on reading novels set in the Grishaverse. So, at least I’ll always have that.

  5. Jason

    I rarely write reviews let alone bad reviews but this book is terrible. Not sure what everyone else is reading. By page 300 I skimmed the rest. The book bounced around and I could not understand what was going on. It made my head hurt. Not sure who the characters are or their purpose. It was just boring and did not like any of the characters. Take my advice if you are not into by page 200 give up and file it away. There are so many more books to read.

  6. DDR

    Ninth House is more densely written, and more structurally complex, than Leigh Bardugo’s (altogether brilliant) Grishaverse novels, novellas, and short stories, with details that are a little grittier, darker, maybe even meaner than what she’s written before. It weaves backwards and forwards in time to allow Galaxy “Alex” Stern’s mystery to unfold like a flower unfurling its petals, and while those petals are dark, indeed, they are none the less dazzling and beautiful for their darkness. As with all of Ms. Bardugo’s work, the story does not go quite where you might have thought it would when you started reading, because there is nothing simplistic or predictable or formulaic about the writer. Where it does go, however, is into an eminently satisfying denouement which will leave you eager for more. The plot-twists may be completely unexpected and unpredictable, but they do not come out of left field. You can see, as you read the twists, how all the threads leading to them have been well and subtly woven into the fabric of the narrative, even if you were so busy following other thread patterns that you didn’t see these particular patterns emerging. You are left, not feeling cheated or blindsided, but dazzled and satisfied. And impatient for the next book in the series. Ninth House is an outstanding book by one of the best fantasy writers working today. Enjoy.

  7. Chanda Reads

    I’ve been a Bardugo fan since reading Shadow and Bone several years ago. I was so excited when she announced she would finally be writing an adult book and I was *not* disappointed. It’s gritty and dark in all the right places and deals with big issues like drug addiction, mental health, and corruption very well. The characters are well and fully developed and the story had me on the edge of my seat the whole time. Definitely recommend!

  8. Osca

    Let me start by saying I am a huge fan of Bardugo and have loved her previous work. The ninth house was a pre order months in advance and I couldn’t wait to start it. It even had a promising start, confusing, but promising. Yale, magic, backstories of people evolving etc. Yet the book became more and more a joke the further I got. The plot kept changing, our protagonist being able to overcome things she shouldn’t be and the pace was set so high for her, that my own head started spinning from it. It was too much, every single bit was too much. From the “ground zero” story line and her back story, to her “roommates” (really why even keep that in the story, complete side track) to having 5 story lines combined into one book. It was way way too much and in my opinion made it bad.This idea she had was great, I just wish someone had told Bardugo to take another year and start editing as much as possible OUT of it. All in all, disappointed and do not recommend. Pick up any of her other books, especially the six of crows duo logy

  9. Danna

    I am so disappointed. The hype surrounding this book had me very excited to try out a new author. I ordered it in hardback. I tried so very hard to make myself read it. The book failed to hook me in or intrigue me. I became frustrated with how boring and confusing it was with all of jumping around and characters. After it became apparent that this book was one that I could not even make myself to read, the buyers remorse set in hard. Sadly, I will no longer trust the early reviews and hype enough to jump into a new author.

  10. Victoria K.

    This book is fantastic. The ending is perfection, and that hardly ever happens. It seems slow at the beginning and you may be confused, but keep reading – it picks up at 35% and doesn’t stop. I hope this is a series because I cannot get enough of Alex, Darlington, and Dawes. Don’t think twice about buying this. Just one click it and give yourself time to read because you won’t be able to put it down.

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