Free Two-Day Shipping on Select Orders
Close

28 Summers

(10 customer reviews)

$17.99$28.00

by Elin Hilderbrand

Synopsis

A “captivating and bittersweet” novel by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Summer of ’69: Their secret love affair has lasted for decades — but this could be the summer that changes everything (People).

When Mallory Blessing’s son, Link, receives deathbed instructions from his mother to call a number on a slip of paper in her desk drawer, he’s not sure what to expect. But he certainly does not expect Jake McCloud to answer. It’s the late spring of 2020 and Jake’s wife, Ursula DeGournsey, is the frontrunner in the upcoming Presidential election.

There must be a mistake, Link thinks. How do Mallory and Jake know each other?

>  GET THE E-BOOK  <

Clear
Categories: , , Tags: , , , ,

About this book

473 Pages
10 - 11 Hours to read
128k Total words

Description

A “captivating and bittersweet” novel by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Summer of ’69: Their secret love affair has lasted for decades — but this could be the summer that changes everything (People).

When Mallory Blessing’s son, Link, receives deathbed instructions from his mother to call a number on a slip of paper in her desk drawer, he’s not sure what to expect. But he certainly does not expect Jake McCloud to answer. It’s the late spring of 2020 and Jake’s wife, Ursula DeGournsey, is the frontrunner in the upcoming Presidential election.

There must be a mistake, Link thinks. How do Mallory and Jake know each other?

Flashback to the sweet summer of 1993: Mallory has just inherited a beachfront cottage on Nantucket from her aunt, and she agrees to host her brother’s bachelor party. Cooper’s friend from college, Jake McCloud, attends, and Jake and Mallory form a bond that will persevere — through marriage, children, and Ursula’s stratospheric political rise — until Mallory learns she’s dying.

Based on the classic film Same Time Next Year (which Mallory and Jake watch every summer), 28 Summers explores the agony and romance of a one-weekend-per-year affair and the dramatic ways this relationship complicates and enriches their lives

and the lives of the people they love.

 

Additional information

FORMAT

Hardcover, Paperback

10 reviews for 28 Summers

  1. Amazon Customer

    I would have given this book 5 stars had it not been for Elin not so subtly sneaking in her political opinions on this one. I really enjoy her books and look at them as an escape from the every day minutia, especially social media. I enjoyed how she started each chapter with a different year and the major events that happened in that year. Those are facts. I did not care for the chapter where she blatantly references Judge Kavanaugh and the Me Too movement using one of her main characters to get her own opinions in on the matter. I read these books to get away from the inundation of people’s political opinions.

  2. kate a

    i usually like this author for fun summer reads.I did not like any of the characters in this book. Mallory and Jakes romance was immature, inappropriate, and bad for everyone involved.I also did not appreciate the lengthy and not necessary to the plot fake Kavanaugh hearing virtue signalling portion of the book.

  3. Pink Amy

    2.5 STARSEvery third Tuesday in June, I look forward to Elin Hilderbrand’s summer release. I started reading 28 SUMMERS before sunrise and knew I’d finish before day’s end.Mallory’s lifelong relationship with Jake begins by flirting on the telephone. He answers the phone whenever she calls his brother Cooper at college. Several years later inspired by the movie Same Time, Next Year Mallory and Jake decide to hookup on Nantucket every Labor Day weekend. Even after he marries his childhood sweetheart, the affair continues until Mallory enters hospice.28 SUMMERS is probably my least favorite of Hilderbrand’s books because I never bought into Jake marrying Ursula. Though readers are told about their bond, I never saw evidence in their interactions. Jake and Mallory seemed to love each other, yet never even talked about more.Hilderbrand takes us through each of the 28 SUMMERS and at times I counted how many more summers I had to read through. When I came to the end, I was disappointed that I felt no payoff.I liked Mallory a lot, though her judgment wasn’t always the best in terms of men, often due to alcohol.28 SUMMERS isn’t a bad book, Hilderbrand set the bar so high with many of her other books my expectations were greater than the reading experience.

  4. JustJill

    I love Elin Hilderbrand’s book and look forward to them every year. While the beauty of Nantucket is awesome in this read, I just couldn’t finish. The story is so week and the characters are not relatable. They don’t make a choice that makes sense. There is now plot, each chapter can almost stand alone.Maybe my expectations were too high?

  5. brennie

    I look forward to this author’s books every summer. I have to agree with some of the other reviewers, I didn’t much care for this one. It was not bad, just wasn’t up to par with Ms. Hilderbrand’s usual books. I did not look at Mallory & Jake’s relationship as a sweet and romantic. I saw it as Mallory pining after a man she could only see a few days a year. And a weak man, Jake, who married Ursula for no good reason. There was no good reason given, either, why these two couldn’t be together full time if they loved each other so much. They both had money and Jake could have found work on Nantucket or working remotely. Mallory basically gave up having a normal, healthy relationship for a man she could have 3 days a year; a married man, at that. Whereas Jake got to ‘have his cake and eat it too’ which didn’t make him very attractive to me. And yes, various stereotypes were used – The high powered Ursula; the overly fanatic liberal, Bess. I did not appreciate the thinly veiled digs at the Kavanaugh confirmation either. Nor the anti-gun stance. My preference is for the author to leave her, apparently, personal politics out of her books. My favorite character was Cooper. At any rate, I will still definitely buy her next summer read but I hope she goes back to her ‘old’ formula of books. They seem to be going downhill over the years. The characters in this book were not realistic at all for the most part. They were ‘on paper’ characters and hardly any of them seemed ‘real.’

  6. madime39

    Elin is back, and better than ever! After, in my opinion, several dismal failures the last few years, Elin has hit one out of the park. This book is by far her best one yet.So, only four stars. In the book, in one October, a tragic thing happens. Many pages later, Mallory implies that it happened just after Christmas. Confused, I double back, re-read, and confirm: the story does say it happened in October. Then, many more pages (and months) later, Mallory says that “this will be my first Christmas without…” .But it wasn’t, because according to the story, the tragedy occurred in October, and it’s now August. She had already had one Christmas “without”.It’s a little thing, but I absolutely cannot stand stupid mistakes like this in a book. First, I’ve paid decent money for it. Two, the author, proofreader(s), editor, etc have been paid handsomely to do their jobs. Three, I would imagine many others have read the book before going to press. How does no one catch these mistakes? Four, it literally was so confusing that I thought I missed some important part of the story, so ill turning back and flipping around the pages, making myself nuts trying to figure out where I’m at in these “28 summers”.I will reiterate: this book is amazing, probably one of the best I’ve read. Also, I understand everyone is human, and humans makes mistakes. But there should be more than enough people involved in the making of a book to catch mistakes that interrupt the flow of a story. If they don’t catch mistakes, they’re not doing their job.

  7. Jane Schneider

    What is going on with this book? Women who wait around to be mistreated by men who appear and disappear year after year need help, not glorification.Men who behave the way they do in this book should not have their weaknesses shown as sympathetic, but just pathetic.I just am not sure what this book was trying to show about relationships.Please don’t waste your money.

  8. gaga6789

    I’ve read Hildebrand before, but I couldn’t put this down. I read it in one sitting and I wish I had stretched it out. It’s so good. I already miss the characters.

  9. Sharon Stout

    The “same time, next year” plot just seems sad — especially during a pandemic when we’re struggling with isolation. But even taken as given, the individual summer segments are disappointing. In some, the two main characters do not even interact. What happened to the Labor Day weekend interludes? It is as if Hilderbrand tired of the plot device she chose even before she finished the book.The politics that enter into the plot are unbearable to me: It seems all too plausible that the very wealthy Bayer Burkhart “dabbles in politics” but his admission “I pull the puppet strings” on p.145 just put me on notice that yes, at some point he will. I don’t like dark money in real life politics — I most emphatically don’t want it in my summer fiction.

  10. Kindle Customer

    Elin Hilderbrand is a good writer. I have enjoyed her books. But I am thoroughly disgusted with writers who choose to turn their novels into political screeds. Hilderbrand slid her political preferences in at the end of what was a good story. I felt ripped off and offended by this sneaky attempt. The sly insertion of her take on the Supreme Court witch hunt did nothing for the story but let the reader know Hilderbrand’s opinions. As a reader I prefer to choose to buy and read a book WITHOUT a skewed political opinion.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.