Philosophy

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  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    Synopsis

    Writing in an age when the call for the rights of man had brought revolution to America and France, Mary Wollstonecraft produced her own declaration of female independence in 1792. Passionate and forthright, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman attacked the prevailing view of docile, decorative femininity, and instead laid out the principles of emancipation: an equal education for girls and boys, an end to prejudice, and for women to become defined by their profession, not their partner. Mary Wollstonecraft’s work was received with a mixture of admiration and outrage – Walpole called her ‘a hyena in petticoats’ – yet it established her as the mother of modern feminism.

  • Utopia

    by Thomas More

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    by Thomas More

    Synopsis

    De Optimo Republicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia (translated On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia) or more simply Utopia is a 1516 book by Sir (Saint) Thomas More. The book, written in Latin, is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional island society and its religious, social and political customs. The name of the place is derived from the Greek words οὐ u ("not") and τόπος tópos ("place"), with the topographical suffix -εία eía, hence Οὐτοπεία outopeía (Latinized as Utopia), “no-place land.” It also contains a pun, however, because “Utopia” could also be the Latinization of Εὐτοπεία eutopeía, “good-place land,” which uses the Greek prefix ευ eu, “good,” instead of οὐ. One interpretation holds that this suggests that while Utopia might be some sort of perfected society, it is ultimately unreachable. Despite modern connotations of the word "utopia," it is widely accepted that the society More describes in this work was not actually his own "perfect society." Rather he wished to use the contrast between the imaginary land's unusual political ideas and the chaotic politics of his own day as a platform from which to discuss social issues in Europe.

  • Utilitarianism

    by John Stuart Mill

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by John Stuart Mill

    Synopsis

    John Stuart Mill's book Utilitarianism is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism in ethics. The essay first appeared as a series of three articles published in Fraser's Magazine in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. It went through four editions during Mill's lifetime with minor additions and revisions. Although Mill includes discussions of utilitarian ethical principles in other works such as On Liberty and The Subjection of Women, Utilitarianism contains Mill's only major discussion of the fundamental grounds for utilitarian ethical theory.

  • Timaeus

    by Plato

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Plato

    Synopsis

    Human Science Novel.

  • Thus Spake Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

    Synopsis

    Thus Spoke Zarathustra (German: Also sprach Zarathustra, sometimes translated Thus Spake Zarathustra), subtitled A Book for All and None (Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen), is a written work by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the "prophecy" of the Overman, which were first introduced in The Gay Science. Described by Nietzsche himself as "the deepest ever written", the book is a dense and esoteric treatise on philosophy and morality, featuring as protagonist a fictionalized Zarathustra. A central irony of the text is that the style of the Bible is used by Nietzsche to present ideas of his which fundamentally oppose Judaeo-Christian morality and tradition.

  • Thoughts are Things

    by Prentice Mulford

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Prentice Mulford

    Synopsis

    Prentice Mulford was instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

Product categories
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    Synopsis

    Writing in an age when the call for the rights of man had brought revolution to America and France, Mary Wollstonecraft produced her own declaration of female independence in 1792. Passionate and forthright, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman attacked the prevailing view of docile, decorative femininity, and instead laid out the principles of emancipation: an equal education for girls and boys, an end to prejudice, and for women to become defined by their profession, not their partner. Mary Wollstonecraft’s work was received with a mixture of admiration and outrage – Walpole called her ‘a hyena in petticoats’ – yet it established her as the mother of modern feminism.

  • Utopia

    by Thomas More

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Thomas More

    Synopsis

    De Optimo Republicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia (translated On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia) or more simply Utopia is a 1516 book by Sir (Saint) Thomas More. The book, written in Latin, is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional island society and its religious, social and political customs. The name of the place is derived from the Greek words οὐ u ("not") and τόπος tópos ("place"), with the topographical suffix -εία eía, hence Οὐτοπεία outopeía (Latinized as Utopia), “no-place land.” It also contains a pun, however, because “Utopia” could also be the Latinization of Εὐτοπεία eutopeía, “good-place land,” which uses the Greek prefix ευ eu, “good,” instead of οὐ. One interpretation holds that this suggests that while Utopia might be some sort of perfected society, it is ultimately unreachable. Despite modern connotations of the word "utopia," it is widely accepted that the society More describes in this work was not actually his own "perfect society." Rather he wished to use the contrast between the imaginary land's unusual political ideas and the chaotic politics of his own day as a platform from which to discuss social issues in Europe.

  • Utilitarianism

    by John Stuart Mill

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by John Stuart Mill

    Synopsis

    John Stuart Mill's book Utilitarianism is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism in ethics. The essay first appeared as a series of three articles published in Fraser's Magazine in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. It went through four editions during Mill's lifetime with minor additions and revisions. Although Mill includes discussions of utilitarian ethical principles in other works such as On Liberty and The Subjection of Women, Utilitarianism contains Mill's only major discussion of the fundamental grounds for utilitarian ethical theory.

  • Timaeus

    by Plato

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Plato

    Synopsis

    Human Science Novel.

  • Thus Spake Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

    Synopsis

    Thus Spoke Zarathustra (German: Also sprach Zarathustra, sometimes translated Thus Spake Zarathustra), subtitled A Book for All and None (Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen), is a written work by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the "prophecy" of the Overman, which were first introduced in The Gay Science. Described by Nietzsche himself as "the deepest ever written", the book is a dense and esoteric treatise on philosophy and morality, featuring as protagonist a fictionalized Zarathustra. A central irony of the text is that the style of the Bible is used by Nietzsche to present ideas of his which fundamentally oppose Judaeo-Christian morality and tradition.

  • Thoughts are Things

    by Prentice Mulford

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Prentice Mulford

    Synopsis

    Prentice Mulford was instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Mary Wollstonecraft

    Synopsis

    Writing in an age when the call for the rights of man had brought revolution to America and France, Mary Wollstonecraft produced her own declaration of female independence in 1792. Passionate and forthright, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman attacked the prevailing view of docile, decorative femininity, and instead laid out the principles of emancipation: an equal education for girls and boys, an end to prejudice, and for women to become defined by their profession, not their partner. Mary Wollstonecraft’s work was received with a mixture of admiration and outrage – Walpole called her ‘a hyena in petticoats’ – yet it established her as the mother of modern feminism.

  • Utopia

    by Thomas More

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Thomas More

    Synopsis

    De Optimo Republicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia (translated On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia) or more simply Utopia is a 1516 book by Sir (Saint) Thomas More. The book, written in Latin, is a frame narrative primarily depicting a fictional island society and its religious, social and political customs. The name of the place is derived from the Greek words οὐ u ("not") and τόπος tópos ("place"), with the topographical suffix -εία eía, hence Οὐτοπεία outopeía (Latinized as Utopia), “no-place land.” It also contains a pun, however, because “Utopia” could also be the Latinization of Εὐτοπεία eutopeía, “good-place land,” which uses the Greek prefix ευ eu, “good,” instead of οὐ. One interpretation holds that this suggests that while Utopia might be some sort of perfected society, it is ultimately unreachable. Despite modern connotations of the word "utopia," it is widely accepted that the society More describes in this work was not actually his own "perfect society." Rather he wished to use the contrast between the imaginary land's unusual political ideas and the chaotic politics of his own day as a platform from which to discuss social issues in Europe.

  • Utilitarianism

    by John Stuart Mill

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by John Stuart Mill

    Synopsis

    John Stuart Mill's book Utilitarianism is a philosophical defense of utilitarianism in ethics. The essay first appeared as a series of three articles published in Fraser's Magazine in 1861; the articles were collected and reprinted as a single book in 1863. It went through four editions during Mill's lifetime with minor additions and revisions. Although Mill includes discussions of utilitarian ethical principles in other works such as On Liberty and The Subjection of Women, Utilitarianism contains Mill's only major discussion of the fundamental grounds for utilitarian ethical theory.

  • Timaeus

    by Plato

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Plato

    Synopsis

    Human Science Novel.

  • Thus Spake Zarathustra

    by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

    Synopsis

    Thus Spoke Zarathustra (German: Also sprach Zarathustra, sometimes translated Thus Spake Zarathustra), subtitled A Book for All and None (Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen), is a written work by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the "prophecy" of the Overman, which were first introduced in The Gay Science. Described by Nietzsche himself as "the deepest ever written", the book is a dense and esoteric treatise on philosophy and morality, featuring as protagonist a fictionalized Zarathustra. A central irony of the text is that the style of the Bible is used by Nietzsche to present ideas of his which fundamentally oppose Judaeo-Christian morality and tradition.

  • Thoughts are Things

    by Prentice Mulford

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    by Prentice Mulford

    Synopsis

    Prentice Mulford was instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.