Fairy Tales

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Showing 1–6 of 22 results

  • The Yellow Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    The Editor thinks that children will readily forgive him for publishing another Fairy Book. We have had the Blue, the Red, the Green, and here is the Yellow. If children are pleased, and they are so kind as to say that they are pleased, the Editor does not care very much for what other people may say.

  • The Red Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d'Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. The Red Fairy Book is the second in the series. (wikipedia)

  • The Orange Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books — also known as Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's Fairy Books of Many Colors — are a series of twelve collections of fairy tales, published between 1889 and 1910.

  • Japanese Fairy Tales

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byYei Theodora Ozaki

    Synopsis

    This collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a suggestion made to me indirectly through a friend by Mr. Andrew Lang. They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved, they have been told more with the view to interest young readers of the West than the technical student of folk-lore.

  • Irish Fairy Tales

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byJames Stephens

    Synopsis

    The lore of ancient Ireland comes to life in this collection of classic folk tales retold for modern readers.

  • The Grey Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    The tales in the Grey Fairy Book are derived from many countries—Lithuania, various parts of Africa, Germany, France, Greece, and other regions of the world.

Product categories
  • The Yellow Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    The Editor thinks that children will readily forgive him for publishing another Fairy Book. We have had the Blue, the Red, the Green, and here is the Yellow. If children are pleased, and they are so kind as to say that they are pleased, the Editor does not care very much for what other people may say.

  • The Red Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d'Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. The Red Fairy Book is the second in the series. (wikipedia)

  • The Orange Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books — also known as Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's Fairy Books of Many Colors — are a series of twelve collections of fairy tales, published between 1889 and 1910.

  • Japanese Fairy Tales

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byYei Theodora Ozaki

    Synopsis

    This collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a suggestion made to me indirectly through a friend by Mr. Andrew Lang. They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved, they have been told more with the view to interest young readers of the West than the technical student of folk-lore.

  • Irish Fairy Tales

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byJames Stephens

    Synopsis

    The lore of ancient Ireland comes to life in this collection of classic folk tales retold for modern readers.

  • The Grey Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    The tales in the Grey Fairy Book are derived from many countries—Lithuania, various parts of Africa, Germany, France, Greece, and other regions of the world.

  • The Yellow Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    The Editor thinks that children will readily forgive him for publishing another Fairy Book. We have had the Blue, the Red, the Green, and here is the Yellow. If children are pleased, and they are so kind as to say that they are pleased, the Editor does not care very much for what other people may say.

  • The Red Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d'Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories. The Red Fairy Book is the second in the series. (wikipedia)

  • The Orange Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    Andrew Lang's Fairy Books — also known as Andrew Lang's "Coloured" Fairy Books or Andrew Lang's Fairy Books of Many Colors — are a series of twelve collections of fairy tales, published between 1889 and 1910.

  • Japanese Fairy Tales

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byYei Theodora Ozaki

    Synopsis

    This collection of Japanese fairy tales is the outcome of a suggestion made to me indirectly through a friend by Mr. Andrew Lang. They have been translated from the modern version written by Sadanami Sanjin. These stories are not literal translations, and though the Japanese story and all quaint Japanese expressions have been faithfully preserved, they have been told more with the view to interest young readers of the West than the technical student of folk-lore.

  • Irish Fairy Tales

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byJames Stephens

    Synopsis

    The lore of ancient Ireland comes to life in this collection of classic folk tales retold for modern readers.

  • The Grey Fairy Book

    by

    [trx_socials type="icons" size="tiny" shape="round" custom="no" top="inherit" bottom="inherit" left="inherit" right="inherit"][/trx_socials]

    byAndrew Lang

    Synopsis

    The tales in the Grey Fairy Book are derived from many countries—Lithuania, various parts of Africa, Germany, France, Greece, and other regions of the world.