OLIVE, AGAIN REVIEW

OLIVE, AGAIN REVIEW

OLIVE, AGAIN

 
 
 
 
 Perfectly composed and full of compassion and empathy, on occasion intolerably impactful. An exciting book all around.
 
 

READ REVIEW

OLIVE, AGAIN

BY Elizabeth strout ‧ RELEASE DATE: OCT. 15, 2019 

The thorny female authority in a matriarch of Crosby, Maine, makes an anticipated return. 

 

As in Strout’s Pulitzer Prize–winning Olive Kitteridge (2008, and so forth.), the considerable title character is consistently a presence yet not in every case in front of an audience in these 13 interconnected stories of depression, misfortune, and love in its many defective manifestations. Olive has not gotten any easier to like since her better half, Henry, kicked the bucket two years back; “moronic” is a most loved adjective, and “phooey to you” a continuous term of excusal. Yet, over the time about 10 years we see Olive battling, in her own rigid way, to become “goodness, only a minuscule—little—piece better personally.” Her second marriage, to Jack Kennison, makes a difference. “I like you, Olive,” he says. “I don’t know why, truly. Yet, I do.” Readers will feel the equivalent, as she bluntly comforts a previous understudy with disease in “Light” and sympathizes with the lamenting little girl in-law she has never much enjoyed in “Motherless Child.” Yet that story closes with Olive’s forlorn decision that she is generally answerable for her laden relationship with her child: “She herself had [raised] a motherless youngster.” Parents are repelled from kids, spouses from wives, kin from one another in this keening picture of a world in which every one of us is on a very basic level alone and never genuinely knows even those we love the most. This isn’t the entire story, Strout exhibits with her standard sympathy and wealth of detail. “You probably been an awesome mother,” Olive’s primary care physician says in the wake of watching Christopher in gave participation at the emergency clinic after she has a respiratory failure, and the girl of a heavy drinker mother and cavalier, oppressive dad finds a supporting substitute in her folks’ legal advisor in “Helped.” The magnificence of the regular world gives a continuing contrast to charged human associations wherein “there were endless things that couldn’t be said.” There’s no straightforward truth about human presence, Strout reminds us, just superb, difficult unpredictability. “Indeed, such is reality,” Olive says. “Nothing you can do about it.” 

 

 Perfectly composed and full of compassion and empathy, on occasion intolerably impactful. An exciting book all around.

OLIVE, AGAIN

BY ELIZABETH STROUT ‧ RELEASE DATE: OCT. 15, 2019 

The thorny female authority in a matriarch of Crosby, Maine, makes an anticipated return. 

 

As in Strout’s Pulitzer Prize–winning Olive Kitteridge (2008, and so forth.), the considerable title character is consistently a presence yet not in every case in front of an audience in these 13 interconnected stories of depression, misfortune, and love in its many defective manifestations. Olive has not gotten any easier to like since her better half, Henry, kicked the bucket two years back; “moronic” is a most loved adjective, and “phooey to you” a continuous term of excusal. Yet, over the time about 10 years we see Olive battling, in her own rigid way, to become “goodness, only a minuscule—little—piece better personally.” Her second marriage, to Jack Kennison, makes a difference. “I like you, Olive,” he says. “I don’t know why, truly. Yet, I do.” Readers will feel the equivalent, as she bluntly comforts a previous understudy with disease in “Light” and sympathizes with the lamenting little girl in-law she has never much enjoyed in “Motherless Child.” Yet that story closes with Olive’s forlorn decision that she is generally answerable for her laden relationship with her child: “She herself had [raised] a motherless youngster.” Parents are repelled from kids, spouses from wives, kin from one another in this keening picture of a world in which every one of us is on a very basic level alone and never genuinely knows even those we love the most. This isn’t the entire story, Strout exhibits with her standard sympathy and wealth of detail. “You probably been an awesome mother,” Olive’s primary care physician says in the wake of watching Christopher in gave participation at the emergency clinic after she has a respiratory failure, and the girl of a heavy drinker mother and cavalier, oppressive dad finds a supporting substitute in her folks’ legal advisor in “Helped.” The magnificence of the regular world gives a continuing contrast to charged human associations wherein “there were endless things that couldn’t be said.” There’s no straightforward truth about human presence, Strout reminds us, just superb, difficult unpredictability. “Indeed, such is reality,” Olive says. “Nothing you can do about it.” 

 

 Perfectly composed and full of compassion and empathy, on occasion intolerably impactful. An exciting book all around.


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Published Date: Oct. 15, 2019 

ISBN: 978-0-8129-9654-8 

Page Count: 304 

Distributer: Random House 

Classes: LITERARY FICTION | FAMILY LIFE and FRIENDSHIP

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