AGENT SONYA REVIEW

AGENT SONYA REVIEW​

AGENT SONYA

 

    A gripping investigation of a surprisingly accomplished twentieth century spy.  

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AGENT SONYA

BY BEN MACINTYRE ‧ RELEASE DATE: SEP. 15, 2020

The awakening story of the Soviet Union’s most praised female government operative. 

 

In the range of her long, vivid life, Ursula Kuczynski (1907-2000) rose in the Soviet positions to the degree of colonel and, in her later years, turned into an author and memoirist under the name Ruth Werner. Destined to a well-off, left-inclining German Jewish family, she obtained solid socialist feelings in her youngsters. Her vocation in undercover work (code name: Sonya) started in 1930 after she migrated to Shanghai with her first spouse, Rudolph Hamburger. In his most recent engaging verifiable covert operative spine chiller, Macintyre tracks Sonya’s various daring adventures during her prolific career. Drawing from her journals, correspondences, and broad meetings with her two grown-up children, the creator makes an account that fills in as both an engaging chronicled story and a humane representation of Sonya as an intricate and complex woman with unmistakably modern sensibilities for her time. Requesting and increasingly unsafe tasks drove Sonya and her family from Shanghai to Poland, Switzerland, and, in the long run, England. En route, she turned out to be profoundly gifted at building and working remote radio transmitters and furthermore aced a few dialects. Her definitive achievement rose through her correspondence with atomic physicist Klaus Fuchs, communicating logical mysteries that empowered the Soviets to build up a nuclear weapon. In spite of the fact that her heart was shaken when she in the long run got a handle on the degree of Stalin’s deadly plans, she stayed dedicated to socialist causes. Investing wholeheartedly in her aptitudes and achievements, she was additionally determined by the adventure of secret activities work. “Endurance against the chances carries with it an adrenaline high and a feeling of fate from deceiving destiny,” composes Macintyre, proceeding, “as a prepared knowledge official, she would have the chance to think of her own story in the pages of history. Ursula turned into a government operative for the sake of proletariat, revolution and the transformation; however she additionally did it for herself, driven by the exceptional blend of aspiration, sentiment, and experience that rose inside her.”

AGENT SONYA

BY BEN MACINTYRE ‧ RELEASE DATE: SEP. 15, 2020

The awakening story of the Soviet Union’s most praised female government operative. 

 

In the range of her long, vivid life, Ursula Kuczynski (1907-2000) rose in the Soviet positions to the degree of colonel and, in her later years, turned into an author and memoirist under the name Ruth Werner. Destined to a well-off, left-inclining German Jewish family, she obtained solid socialist feelings in her youngsters. Her vocation in undercover work (code name: Sonya) started in 1930 after she migrated to Shanghai with her first spouse, Rudolph Hamburger. In his most recent engaging verifiable covert operative spine chiller, Macintyre tracks Sonya’s various daring adventures during her prolific career. Drawing from her journals, correspondences, and broad meetings with her two grown-up children, the creator makes an account that fills in as both an engaging chronicled story and a humane representation of Sonya as an intricate and complex woman with unmistakably modern sensibilities for her time. Requesting and increasingly unsafe tasks drove Sonya and her family from Shanghai to Poland, Switzerland, and, in the long run, England. En route, she turned out to be profoundly gifted at building and working remote radio transmitters and furthermore aced a few dialects. Her definitive achievement rose through her correspondence with atomic physicist Klaus Fuchs, communicating logical mysteries that empowered the Soviets to build up a nuclear weapon. In spite of the fact that her heart was shaken when she in the long run got a handle on the degree of Stalin’s deadly plans, she stayed dedicated to socialist causes. Investing wholeheartedly in her aptitudes and achievements, she was additionally determined by the adventure of secret activities work. “Endurance against the chances carries with it an adrenaline high and a feeling of fate from deceiving destiny,” composes Macintyre, proceeding, “as a prepared knowledge official, she would have the chance to think of her own story in the pages of history. Ursula turned into a government operative for the sake of proletariat, revolution and the transformation; however she additionally did it for herself, driven by the exceptional blend of aspiration, sentiment, and experience that rose inside her.”


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Pub Date: Sept. 15, 2020 

ISBN: N/A 

Page Count: 368 

Distributer: Crown 

Classifications: HISTORY | MILITARY | MODERN | TRUE CRIME | HISTORICAL and MILITARY | BIOGRAPHY and MEMOIR

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